What's the Cost of Teacher Turnover?

High teacher turnover—or churn—undermines student achievement and consumes valuable staff time and resources. It also contributes to teacher shortages throughout the country, as roughly 6 of 10 new teachers hired each year are replacing colleagues who left the classroom before retirement. Research shows that urban districts can, on average, spend more than $20,000 on each new hire, including school and district expenses related to separation, recruitment, hiring, and training. These investments don’t pay their full dividend when teachers leave within 1 or 2 years after being hired. Turnover rates vary by school and district, with those in rural and urban settings or that serve high percentages of student in poverty experiencing the highest rates. Use this tool to estimate the cost of teacher turnover in your school or district and to inform a local conversation about how to attract, support, and retain a high-quality teacher workforce. High-leverage strategies are highlighted below.


Filter By

Available Resources


California Special Education Teacher Shortages Grow More Severe
Resource type:
Brief, Report
California Special Education Teacher Shortages Grow More Severe
Resource type:
Brief, Report
Resource description

California schools have had persistent difficulties filling special education vacancies, but in the past two years, these shortages have skyrocketed, as evidenced by the growth of substandard special education authorizations. When schools struggle to fill a position with a qualified teacher, they often hire teachers who are still in training or who hold emergency-type permits without training.


Related policy solutions
Effective Training & Support for New Teachers
Go To Page
How Beginning Special and General Education Teachers Negotiate Role Expectations and Access Professional Resources
Resource type:
Research
How Beginning Special and General Education Teachers Negotiate Role Expectations and Access Professional Resources
Resource type:
Research
Resource description

This paper explores differences in the curricular, instructional, and role expectations experienced by beginning special and general education teachers. It also documents variations in how novices from both groups addressed expectations they encountered. The authors provide evidence that the instructional decisions and resources associated with positive induction experiences for the new special educators in this study seemed to differ from those associated with comparable experiences for the novice general educators. 


Related policy solutions
Effective Training & Support for New Teachers , Teaching Conditions & Supportive Leadership
Print
A Coming Crisis in Teaching? Teacher Supply, Demand, and Shortages in the U.S.
Resource type:
Brief, Report
A Coming Crisis in Teaching? Teacher Supply, Demand, and Shortages in the U.S.
Resource type:
Brief, Report
Resource description

This report analyzes evidence of teacher shortages, looks at national and regional trends in teacher supply and demand, and investigates policy strategies that might mitigate these effects based on research about effective approaches to recruitment and retention.


Related policy solutions
Service Scholarships & Student Loan Forgiveness , Effective Training & Support for New Teachers , Teaching Conditions & Supportive Leadership , Competitive Compensation
Go To Page
Comparisons of Traditionally and Alternatively Trained Teachers
Resource type:
Research
Comparisons of Traditionally and Alternatively Trained Teachers
Resource type:
Research
Resource description

This paper present findings from a comparative study of 3 teacher preparation prototypes: traditional, university-district partnership, and district add-on programs.


Related policy solutions
Effective Training & Support for New Teachers
Go To Page
Factors That Predict Teachers Staying in, Leaving, or Transferring from the Special Education Classroom
Resource type:
Research
Factors That Predict Teachers Staying in, Leaving, or Transferring from the Special Education Classroom
Resource type:
Research
Resource description

In this study, the authors randomly surveyed 1,576 Florida special education teachers to examine factors that contribute to their propensity to leave or stay in the special education classroom or transfer to a new school. The variables identified, based on extensive review of the literature, included background, classroom, school district, and personal factors. 


Related policy solutions
Effective Training & Support for New Teachers , Teaching Conditions & Supportive Leadership
Print
The Role of School-Based Colleagues in Shaping the Commitment of Novice Special and General Education Teachers
Resource type:
Research
The Role of School-Based Colleagues in Shaping the Commitment of Novice Special and General Education Teachers
Resource type:
Research
Resource description

This paper explores how colleague relationships are critical for the experiences of beginning teachers, as are the school organizational norms that these beginning teachers experience. For special education teachers in particular, perception of colleague support was a strong predictor of retention plans. Similar results were seen with respect to their perception of the level of collective responsibility among the faculty. Taken together, these results suggest that schools and districts should make efforts to facilitate productive relationships between general and special education faculty, as well as to differentiate induction support for beginning special educators.


Related policy solutions
Effective Training & Support for New Teachers , Teaching Conditions & Supportive Leadership
Print
What Makes Special-Education Teachers Special? Teacher Training and Achievement of Students with Disabilities
Resource type:
Research
What Makes Special-Education Teachers Special? Teacher Training and Achievement of Students with Disabilities
Resource type:
Research
Resource description

This paper examines the impact of pre‐service preparation and in‐service formal and informal training on the ability of teachers to promote academic achievement among students with disabilities. It finds that pre‐service preparation in special education has statistically significant and quantitatively substantial effects on the ability of teachers of special education courses to promote gains in achievement for students with disabilities, especially in reading.


Related policy solutions
Effective Training & Support for New Teachers
Print
1 3 4 5 6 7 13